Sign Up for Your Summer 2021 Farm Share Today

Registration for the 2021 Summer season is now Open.

Join Central Brooklyn CSA for 22 weeks of vegetables, fruits, and eggs from Windflower Farm’s 2021 harvest

About the share:
Pick ups happen:
Every Thursday from 5:00 PM to 7:30 PM
June 10 through November 4, 2021

at:
Hebron SDA Church
1256 Dean Street
(On the corner of New York Avenue)
Brooklyn, NY 11216

Here’s a letter from the farm describing what you’ll get:

Warm greetings from all of us at a cold and snowy Windflower Farm! On behalf of the entire Windflower team, I write to invite you to join us for the 2021 CSA season – our 22nd year on the farm. There is still half a foot of snow outside, but it’s going fast, spring is just around the corner, and in the warmth and sunshine of our greenhouses, tens of thousands of spring and summer vegetables are getting their start.

This year, we’ll be working more closely with some of our neighboring organic growers both to enhance our offerings of beans, carrots and squash and to mitigate some of the risk inherent in producing everything in one place. When we do decide to make a crop purchase, it will only be from a farmer we know and whose vegetables are certified organic.

At Windflower Farm, we offer optional shares of brown eggs from the Davis’s pastured hens, and fresh fruits from our farm and throughout the Hudson Valley. New this year, we will be offering maple items from the Davis family. More details about all of these shares can be found by following the sign-up link below. I am sorry to say that we will not be offering a cut flower share this year – Jan will instead be spending the year to work on a long-postponed art project.

Our veteran farm crew is returning, and most are already busy in the greenhouse. They are not only experienced and responsible vegetable growers, but they have completely embraced the new protocols around Covid-19. As a result, the team has stayed healthy throughout the pandemic and we feel we are able to deliver a safe vegetable share to you each and every week of the season.

Our thanks to everyone who made last year’s CSA season a success. Food safety has been a primary concern of ours from the beginning. Our best management practices are informed by the latest information from the CDC and Cornell University Extension. We will continue to pre-box your shares in our safe facilities at the farm. In that way, we will be reducing the food handling chain and your exposure to risk. Your produce boxes and egg cartons can be returned to the farm to be safely reused or recycled.

Warm greetings from all of us at a cold and snowy Windflower Farm! On behalf of the entire Windflower team, I write to invite you to join us for the 2021 CSA season – our 22nd year on the farm. There is still half a foot of snow outside, but it’s going fast, spring is just around the corner, and in the warmth and sunshine of our greenhouses, tens of thousands of spring and summer vegetables are getting their start.

Members of the CSA will get 22 weekly deliveries of fresh, organically grown herbs, greens and seasonal vegetables of all kinds from our solar powered farm in the upper Hudson Valley. You’ll get bicolor sweet corn, tomatoes galore, colorful peppers, salad greens of every kind, cucumbers, carrots, squashes, red onions, shallots, broccoli, red cabbage, fingerling potatoes, fresh green beans, dill, cilantro, basil and much, much more.

This year, we’ll be working more closely with some of our neighboring organic growers both to enhance our offerings of beans, carrots and squash and to mitigate some of the risk inherent in producing everything in one place. When we do decide to make a crop purchase, it will only be from a farmer we know and whose vegetables are certified organic.

At Windflower Farm, we offer optional shares of brown eggs from the Davis’s pastured hens, and fresh fruits from our farm and throughout the Hudson Valley. New this year, we will be offering maple items from the Davis family. More details about all of these shares can be found by following the sign-up link below. I am sorry to say that we will not be offering a cut flower share this year – Jan will instead be spending the year to work on a long-postponed art project.

Our veteran farm crew is returning, and most are already busy in the greenhouse. They are not only experienced and responsible vegetable growers, but they have completely embraced the new protocols around Covid-19. As a result, the team has stayed healthy throughout the pandemic and we feel we are able to deliver a safe vegetable share to you each and every week of the season.

Our thanks to everyone who made last year’s CSA season a success. Food safety has been a primary concern of ours from the beginning. Our best management practices are informed by the latest information from the CDC and Cornell University Extension. We will continue to pre-box your shares in our safe facilities at the farm. In that way, we will be reducing the food handling chain and your exposure to risk. Your produce boxes and egg cartons can be returned to the farm to be safely reused or recycled.

Why join a CSA? You’ll get to eat the freshest of local vegetables and you’ll be exposed to some new vegetables and new ways of preparing them. You’ll develop a relationship with the farmers who grow your food and the practices they use, largely through weekly newsletters and Instagram postings this year, and through farm visits once the pandemic is behind us. Perhaps best of all, you’ll get to be part of a community of your neighbors with a common interest in food, health and sustainability.

We hope you’ll join us for the 2021 season, and we thank you for your generous support of our farm!

Please follow this link to learn more and to become a CSA member: Central Brooklyn CSA – 2021 Membership Form.

Winter Distribution #4, February 6, 2021

The News from Windflower Farm

Happy winter from the Windflower Farm team!  

We write to remind you that your February share, the last of the season, will arrive this Saturday, February 6th, and to relay some information about pickup times and protocol.

See below for a list of distribution times and locations. If you pick up at West Harlem, please note the earlier pick up window.

Please plan to arrive within the time allotted for the distribution or send an alternate to pick up your share. Your share will come pre-packaged in a box that you may take home. We are happy to take boxes back and to recycle them when we next return to the city. Check in with your site coordinator to find out how this can be done at your site.

If you’ve ordered eggs or a maple share, please remember to seek them out – they will not be packaged in your box. Check in with the site coordinator. 

Note that we cannot help you if you have failed to pick up your share on time. We will be in a box truck making our way back home, and we won’t get there until late evening. Please make a plan to pick up your share or to have someone come in your place.

Your February share:

  • Yellow frying/roasting potatoes (Yukon Gem, soft but still delicious)
  • Sweet potatoes (Covington, unwashed)
  • Carrots (Bolero) and beets (Chioggia if they are red skinned and have red and white flesh and Red Ace if they are dark red throughout)
  • Spinach (Space) fresh from the greenhouse
  • Yellow and red onions plus a small garlic bulb and a few shallots (various varieties)
  • Popcorn (Robust 97) and
  • some oddballs, including either a celeriac (Mars) bulb, a rutabaga (Helenor) or a turnip (Gilfeather), depending on supply
  • Apples (Honey Crisp) from the Borden Farm and jam (assorted flavors) from Deb’s Kitchen

All of the vegetables in your share are certified organically grown. Deb’s jam is made from her own backyard berries, which are also grown without pesticides. But the fruit from Borden Farm is not organic. Your sweet potatoes and spinach will not have been washed. Please wash all of your fruits and vegetables before eating.

We had some help filling out this month’s share. The potatoes came from Williams Farm, the Chioggia beets and carrots came from Denison Farm, and the Red Ace beets came from Clearwater Farm. All were grown organically.

What’s new at the farm?

Today, we harvested your spinach where it has been growing since early October in two of our greenhouses. Outside, it was a lovely 40 degrees and sunny; inside, it was nearly 60 degrees and Mark O’Connor and Yo-Yo Ma’s Appalachian Journey was playing over our speakers. The team and I concluded that farming in winter is pretty good work.

On the Monday after our NYC delivery, we’ll clean out the places on our farm where we store vegetables and send the final few pallets of onions, potatoes, spinach and other odd ends to our local food pantry. This marks the end of one farm year for us, and the beginning of the next.

In December, we placed orders for the things we’ll need for the next season. Beginning a couple of weeks ago, boxes of seeds, growing supplies and tractor parts began to arrive almost daily. We’ll fire up the greenhouse on the first day of March, which gives us just a few more weeks to prepare our taxes, finalize the crop plan, hire some new staff and make repairs to the equipment we managed to break last year.

For the next four weeks, we won’t have greenhouses to tend or coolers to mind, which is a relief. We’ll use this time to organize next year’s CSA. For those of you wanting to join us for the 2021 summer CSA season (and we hope that’s all of you!), please stay tuned. Details are being finalized now and sign up information will be sent out in just a few weeks. We’ll save a spot for you!

We hope that you have enjoyed your winter boxes. Please feel free to share your feedback with us by return email. Thank you very much for being with us.

Our very best wishes, Ted, Jan and the Windflower Farm Team

Winter Distribution #3, January, 2021

The News from Windflower Farm

Hello and Happy New Year from the Windflower Farm team!

I write this note following an extraordinary day. As the farm team washed, sorted and bagged vegetables yesterday, we were glued to reports of the U.S Capitol being stormed by a mob who were convinced by a lying president and his enablers that the election was stolen. Today, when we reconvene in the greenhouse to harvest your kale and spinach, my staff and I will no doubt relive the day’s remarkably sad events. It was a day we won’t soon forget.

I interrupt your day to remind you that your January share will arrive this Saturday, January 9th and to share some related information. See below for distribution times and locations. Please plan to arrive within the time allotted for the distribution or send a friend, neighbor, or family member to pick up your share for you.

Your January share:

  • Yellow (and perhaps baking) potatoes and garlic in a bag
  • Sweet potatoes and a butternut squash loose in the box
  • Carrots, beets and kohlrabi in a bag
  • Toscano and Red Russian kale and spinach in a bag
  • Empire (the darker red) and Ida Red apples in a bag
  • A jug of apple cider  

A favorite feel-good soup:

At our house, we really like The Oh She Glows Cookbook by Angela Liddon. Try the “On the Mend Spiced Red Lentil-Kale Soup” if you are looking for something delicious to do with your kale and carrots: https://ohsheglows.com/2012/11/07/spiced-red-lentil-tomato-and-kale-soup/. You’ll note that carrots are not actually a part of the recipe, but we have found that it is much improved by the addition of three or four chopped carrots. Sweet potatoes and butternut squash are also great additions!

Important distribution notes:

Your share will come pre-packaged in a box that you may take home. We are happy to take boxes back and to recycle them when we return in February. Check in with your site coordinator to find out how this can be done at your site. My apologies for the plastic packaging this month. Our paper bag delivery was late in coming.

The apple cider in your share does not fit in the box and is packaged separately. Make sure to grab yours. If you’d prefer, and while supplies last, you may choose to take a second bag of apples instead of a jug of cider.

If you’ve ordered eggs or a maple share, please remember to seek them out – they will not be packaged in your box. Check in with the site coordinator.  

Finally, we cannot help you if you have failed to pick up your share on time. We will be in a box truck making our way back home, and we won’t get there until late evening. Please make a plan to pick up your share or to have someone come in your place.

We hope you enjoy your share! Your next one will be delivered on Saturday, February 6th.

Wishing you a healthy and happy winter season,

Ted and Jan

Distribution #22, Week of November 2, 2020

The News from Windflower Farm

Hello for one last time this season from Windflower Farm (where just a few winter CSA shares are still available!) 

This week’s share

Cabbage

  • Kale
  • Lettuce or Swiss chard
  • Parsley (or cilantro)
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Garlic
  • Peppers
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Carrots

What’s new on the farm

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) is an increasingly vital part of organic farming, and hundreds of small farms in the Northeast thrive because of CSA members like you. Thank you for being a part of our CSA – we hope you enjoyed the experience. I’d especially like to express my gratitude to the volunteers who spend countless hours organizing the CSA. Their work in recruiting members, maintaining websites, managing distributions and in performing countless other tasks is the critical stuff that makes the CSA work. If you think that you’ll be with us next year, consider joining the core group at your pick-up site.   

We at the farm are celebrating our last CSA delivery. As you know, the season comes to an end this week. Victoria, our distribution coordinator, hosted us at her house around a bonfire to celebrate the end of the season. The farm team has been working long days since early March and are ready for a break. I’m very proud of them. Much of the staff will be back at it in a couple of weeks to prepare the first winter boxes. Snowfall bookended the farm season, with a couple of inches in early May, just after planting, and a couple more just last week. Candelaria and her sisters, who are new to snow, had a brief laughter filled snowball fight. Soon, they’d be in the warmth of Central Mexico. For us, there are winter projects that we’ll now have time to turn to, Jan in her studio, and Nate and me in our workshop.

Jan and I hope you have a healthy and happy fall and winter season. We look forward to seeing you before long.

Take care,

Ted and Jan

For more winter share information, please click here: https://windflowerfarm.wufoo.com/forms/m1xr27rk05nzoa8/.

Distribution #21, Week of October 26, 2020

The News from Windflower Farm

Hello from Windflower Farm (where winter CSA shares are still available!) 

This week’s share

  • Savoy cabbage
  • Swiss chard
  • Kale
  • Garlic 
  • Ginger
  • “Rainbow’ carrots 
  • Red potatoes
  • Leeks
  • Butternut squash 

Next week’s share will include shallots, red cabbage and more sweet potatoes along with more of the usual suspects.

If you are an odd week CSA member, this week’s share is your last of the season. On behalf of everyone here at Windflower Farm, many thanks for being with us. We hope you have enjoyed your share of our farm’s 2020 harvest. It is because you decided to be with us that we were able to pursue the work that we love for another year. If you haven’t had enough of our produce, and want to help keep my staff and me from running wild on the back roads of Washington County, consider joining us for our four month, four delivery winter share. It will begin on the Saturday before Thanksgiving Day and run through early February and include hardy greens from our unheated greenhouses, a wide variety of our stored root vegetables, apples and pears from neighboring farms and something sweet (cider or jam or honey) with each delivery. For more winter share information, please click here: https://windflowerfarm.wufoo.com/forms/m1xr27rk05nzoa8/

What’s new on the farm?

Jan, Nate and I have just come in from washing carrots and ginger and it got me thinking about soups. The cookbook, Soup’s On, has one of our favorite recipes featuring these two crops: Coconut Carrot Soup with Ginger and Dill. The only thing better than reaching a beautiful mountain lookout on an October hike is digging into your daypack and finding a thermos full of hot carrot ginger soup with which to admire the view. Nate will post the recipe on our Instagram page.

Many of the ingredients of a potato leek soup can be found in the week’s share, too. Our favorite comes from Moosewood, where carrots are also an important part. This week’s variety of carrot is called ‘Rainbow’ and they are from the last bed on our farm. Then there is butternut squash, which makes one of the very best “feel good’ soups I know. With a pot of soup on the stove, no winter day is too cold, no sky too bleak.

Jan is now napping, Nate is again baking pumpkin muffins for the farm crew – a triple batch for a cold day! – and the Medinas are wrapping up the harvest of some leeks and cabbages. The local staff are off today. They’ll be here tomorrow morning to offload whatever returnables are on the truck, wash tubs and the greens that will be in shares this week, and then fill bags, the heavy vegetables in one, and the light and leafy vegetables in another. 

Our season began in March, which feels like a very long time ago. We welcome the change in seasons and what that portends for those of us whose lives move closely with them. Our last CSA harvest will take place on Wednesday of next week, and although the to-do list is still long, we see an end to the work, or at least a change in the nature of the work. In the next ten days, we’ll plant the final three acres of rye cover crops, transplant the last 20,000 or so of our fall onion sets, cover our strawberries, garlic, onions and winter greens, and tuck away our pumps, unneeded row covers, sand bags and irrigation lines. We expect a low of 17 degrees by week’s end. 

The Medinas will head off to Mexico next Saturday and what appears to be a calendar full of fiestas in celebration of weddings, births and faith. I don’t think they care one way or another about the election here. They expect corruption and division in politics, having had little experience of anything else. Family and community are at the center of their lives. After work today, young Martin came to ask if we would employ his spouse next year. They are hoping to work on a house of their own before starting a family. I told him it was something we would try to make work. 

I believe our election matters. I bet you do, too. I can’t believe that nearly half of us don’t vote. Please tell everyone you know to get out to the polls next week!

Take care, Ted