This Week in the Central Brooklyn CSA

This is what is going on this week in our Central Brooklyn CSA.

Hey Friends,

This week is a busy one for our CSA so we thought it prudent to remind everyone of when and where things are going on.

Week of 2 August 2010

Tuesday – We are posting this week’s expected harvest on our blog.

Wednesday – Share Distribution (4-7:30pm); Cooking Demonstration (5-7pm) at Hebron SDA Church.

Thursday – August Planning Team Meeting at LaunchPad workspace at 7pm. (LaunchPad is located at 721 Franklin Ave, on the corner of Park Place.)

Friday– Our “Weekend Cooking Blog” returns!

Don’t forget you can have Central Brooklyn updates sent directly to you: email subscribe to this blog, join our Facebook group, and/ or follow us on twitter.

Pink Beans in Sauce with Epazote

I take this bean thing seriously, so it was a personal challenge to incorporate epazote into my quest to make the best ever bowl of beans.

Recipe by John-Thomas Crockett

I love beans. Black, pinto, kidney, red, pink, garbanzo, it doesn’t matter: beans are my thing. For the past couple of years I have been in charge of the food at my brother’s Super Bowl Bash ( a fact I am quite proud of), and last year I was actually commissioned to make a couple of pots of beans. Think about that for a moment. More than chicken wings, tacos, ribs, or pizza, folks thought beans, my beans, would take the party to higher heights. With humility, I make a mean bean. It is, in fact, a family thing. After decades of bean dominance, my mother is the undisputed Queen of Beans. After years of studying her techniques and stealing glances at her seasoning selections, I think I am ready to challenge for the title “Bean King.”

I take this bean thing seriously, so when we got epazote in our CSA share and I learned it was often used as a bean seasoning, I took it as a personal challenge to incorporate the herb in my next  iteration of legume goodness.

Continue reading “Pink Beans in Sauce with Epazote”

Zucchini Soup with Beaten Eggs

This is a vegetarian variation of stracciatella highlights the soft flavor and texture of zucchini and is enriched by the addition of eggs, butter, and a bit of cheese.

Courtesy of Emily Nickerson

Adapted from the Cucina di Magro cookbook by G. Franco Romagnoli

This is a vegetarian variation of stracciatella, an Italian soup traditionally made by stirring beaten eggs into a meat-based broth. This version highlights the soft flavor and texture of zucchini and is enriched by the addition of eggs, butter, and a bit of cheese. Bonus: From start to finish this soup took about 30 minutes to prepare, a perfect option on a night when you’re craving a hot meal and don’t have much time or energy to cook.

Continue reading “Zucchini Soup with Beaten Eggs”

Cooking Demo Week 7: A Success!

Check out our Recipe Tab for more recipes recommended by the Food Education Team and visit the CSA Forum to sneak a peak at members’ recipes or add your own

Thank you to all who came and learned how to make Shredded Veggie Pancakes from Emily, our Community Chef! For those who missed the exhibition or simply would like to learn more, we will be having another cooking demonstration at next Wednesday’s ( 4Aug 2010) share distribution.

Check out our Recipe Tab for more recipes recommended by the Food Education Team and visit the CSA Forum to sneak a peak at members’ recipes or add your own.

"The Mona Lisa of Beet Pancakes"
Find out how to get this...
The whole is more delicious than the sum of its parts
....from this

Thank you Joe Wirtheim for the photos!

Kale and Potato Recipe

Member Lorin sent over a great recipe to use for your kale!

Recipe:
(adapted from The Country Cooking of Ireland by Colman Andrews)

serves 8

5 or 6 russet potatoes
2 tbsp butter, plus additional pats for serving
3 cups chopped kale (leaves only)
1 1/3 cups whole milk
4 green onions, chopped
salt and pepper

Put the potatoes in a large pan and cover about halfway with water.
Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for about 40 minutes,
or until potatoes are tender. Pour out the water but keep the potatoes
in the pan and let stand, covered, for about 5 minutes.

Melt the butter in a wide skillet and add the kale. Cook until wilted,
about 5 minutes.

Bring the milk and green onions to a simmer in a saucepan and add a
few pinches of salt and pepper. Stir in the kale, turn off the heat,
and keep covered.

Peel the potatoes and put them in a large bowl. Add the milk and kale,
and mash until nearly smooth, seasoning with additional salt and
pepper to taste.

Divide among bowls and top each serving with a pat of butter.

(I used two cups of milk and skipped adding butter to each serving,
and I chopped up two scapes and simmered them with the milk and green
onions.)

1st Meals of the CSA

Member Sean Rosvold sent out this e-mail to his friends and family after cooking up their first share.  It was posted by our friend’s at Nostrand Park too!

We joined a CSA group and received our first weekly allotment of veggies and eggs straight from the farm. Laurie proceeded to make a wonderful dinner using some of the ingredients.

Romaine lettuce and radishes
Continue reading “1st Meals of the CSA”

Central Brooklyn CSA Blog Meal

For our first Central Brooklyn CSA Blog Meal we made garlic scape pesto and spaghetti, served with a farm fresh fried egg, garnished with fresh cilantro and black pepper: it tastes as awesome as it sounds!

Many of us who picked up our first week of vegetables from Central Brooklyn CSA had the same question: “what in the world is a ‘garlic flower’ and what do I do with it?” Alas, there is nothing to fear, garlic flowers (or, as they are sometimes called, “garlic scapes “) are delicious and just happen to be the centerpiece of our first Central Brooklyn CSA Blog Meal (feel free to help us come up with a better title for the blog meal, too)!

Garlic flowers are members of the Allium family, along with onions, leeks, and scallions. And, yes, as the name implies, these curvey tubes are in fact part of the garlic plant. Famers cut the superfluous stems and buds off of garlic bulbs (or heads, as we call them once harvested) to focus the plants energy on the bulb and not the stalk and flower.

Continue reading “Central Brooklyn CSA Blog Meal”