Meet Your Farmer!

We are happy to announce that next Wednesday, May 26th from 6 – 8 PM will be our Farmer Meet and Greet, with Martin and Gaudencia Rodriguez of MimoMex Farm. This is your time to introduce yourself to the people growing your food, to get to know them, and to ask them questions about the farm!
 
This event will take place at our distribution location, Hebron SDA Church at 1256 Dean Street on the corner of New York Avenue.  Refreshments will be provided.
 
This event is open to all current and interested members of the Central Brooklyn CSA, so spread the word to anyone who may be interested in joining. 

Waitlist for Low Income Shares

As of right now, we are only offering shares in the $35,000+ brackets.  Please be aware that you are more than welcome to partner up with someone and purchase a share in a higher income bracket if you can!

We are also maintaing a waitlist for shares in the under $35,000 brackets, so please contact the CSA coordinator at centralbrooklyncsa@gmail .com, or at 212 825 0028 ext. 205 if you are interested.

Farmworkers’ Rights and Preserving Small Farms: A Conversation About the Farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act

Our farmer, Martin Rodriguez will be participating in this panel discussion, sponsored in part by our supporting organization, The New York City Coalition Against Hunger.  This is going to be a fantastic event, so make sure to register soon!

The Farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act is a New York State bill that was intended to provide fair labor protections to farmworkers who were excluded from the federal fair labor laws enacted in 1939.  The legislation’s opponents have argued that, in its current form, the bill is not fair to smaller farms, which predominate in New York State. This forum will explore how the rights of farmworkers can be ensured without endangering the livelihoods of small farmers.
 
When: May 20th, 6:30 – 8:30pm
Where: Draesel Hall, Church of the Holy Trinity, 316 East 88th St
(between 1st and 2nd Avenues), New York, NY 10128
Suggested donation:  $5-$20. No one will be turned away for lack of funds.  This is to cover the cost of panelists who traveled to speak at this event
Panelists include:
Ms. Jody Bolluyt, farmer, Roxbury Farm, policy committee member for NOFA-NY
Dr. Margaret Gray, Assistant Professor, Adelphi University, currently completing a book manuscript about Hudson Valley agriculture, food politics, and farmworkers.
Ms. Lea Kone, Assistant Director of NOFA NY
Ms. Librada Paz, former farmworker for several decades, farmworker advocate
Mr. Martin Rodriguez, farmer/owner, Mimo Mex Farm
Reverend Richard Witt, Executive Director, Rural & Migrant Ministry

Register for the event here.

Check out our shout-out on “Not Eating Out In New York”

Our good friend Cathy Erway wrote a great piece on the Central Brooklyn CSA… There is still time to sign up, but hurry!  Shares are moving fast!

Shares Only Available in Medium and High Income Categories

Hi Everyone – we still have shares available for purchase in the medium and high income categories.  All our low income shares are, however, sold out!

Thanks everyone for the great response! Don’t forget that we’ve extended the deadline to join. We are proud of the opportunity our CSA provides for members of our community to eat well for less, and want to make sure that everyone who is interested in becoming a member has a chance to.

Having said that, vegetable shares (standard memberships) and fruit and egg shares are going fast, so if you would like to become a member, we urge you to move quickly.

If you are interested but have questions or financial concerns, please contact us (no need to panic!).  If you sent in your deposit and membership agreement and want to make sure we received it, email us at CentralBrooklynCSA@gmail.com and we will get back to you right away.

Affordability

Trying to make a dollar out of 15 cents!

On the average CSA’s cost less than buying the same foods in “traditional” stores.  In fact, when you do the math, most CSA’s cost a lot less. I would not say I am cheap (my girlfriend, however, would), but I do hate to overpay for things. The cost value in most CSA’s is probably the reason I signed on in the first place, and for me, the savings are real.  What’s more, paying for four months of produce all at once helps me budget what I spend on groceries better (sweet!) and helps me eat better, too (more on this in a later post!).

There is a risk in CSA’s – since the food is pre-purchased, local weather conditions can affect the harvest. However, CSA’s use professional farmers, who are up to the challenges that weather provides and rarely if ever are CSA members left holding the (empty) bag. (The proof is in the pudding on this one, most CSA’s bring back the vast majority of their members year-to-year.)

Because CSA’s pair communities directly with farmers and use cooperative labor, they often represent the greatest value in purchasing locally grown, sustainable produce around. But don’t just take my word for it, sign-up and see for yourself!

Membership Has It’s Privileges

Why did I first join a CSA? My girlfriend made me. Ok, she did not so much force me, as much as she led me to believe that if we did not join, my life would be considerably less pleasant for the foreseeable future.  As they say, “Mama didn’t raise no fool,” and shortly thereafter I found myself a member of my first CSA.

There were a lot of reasons I was hesitant to join, but the biggest one was simple: CSA’s are different than the traditional supermarkets I was used to. In most CSA’s, you pay for your share (typically one to two seasons worth of food) all at once, before the season begins. The food is seasonal – meaning you get what naturally comes out of the ground at that time of the year, and since my CSA, like most, partnered with a local farmer, that meant no tomatoes in June. Since I have an unnatural love of tomatoes, this was awful news. The food looks like it has just been harvested – it has – which means there may be a little more dirt on fruits and vegetables than we are accustomed to.  And of course there is a volunteer requirement (you mean I have to pay AND work for my food?!).

If CSA’s are so so different than traditional supermarkets and bodegas, why I am so excited to be a part of a CSA now? The first five reasons that come to mind are 1) it is affordable; 2) the food is delicious; 3) I get to “do something” in my community; 4) I feel like I am making a difference; and 5) it is different than a traditional supermarket.

We thought it would be cool if we made a “Why I joined my CSA, a regular series of posts that anyone can contribute to, so that is exactly what we are doing! Over the next few days, I will post more about my reasons for joining, but we would really love if you took the ball and ran with it – so feel free to comment or write your own post too!

Eat Well, Until We Meet Again,

JT

Mail in Your Forms!

Just a reminder that you CAN mail in your vegetable & fruit and/or eggmembership agreements and payments (Please note, you MUST secure your vegetable share BEFORE you may secure a fruit or egg share).  It is not necessary for you to come to a sign-up event to secure your spot!

You may mail your forms to:

New York City Coalition Against Hunger

50 Broad Street, Suite 1520

New York, NY 10004

Please make checks payable to “NYCCAH”.