CBCSA Newsletter: October 12th Week A

It’s a Week A Pick-Up This Thursday, October 12th!

This week’s share:
-Arugula
-Carrots
-Onions
-Lettuces
-Delicata squash
-Tomatoes
-Broccoli
-Leeks (or potatoes)
-Your choice between kale or tatsoi and dill or cilantro.

Next week, you’ll get your last tomatoes, your first sweet potatoes, plus acorn squashes, fennel, carrots, onions, broccoli, arugula, lettuces and various other greens and herbs. Your fruit share this week is Empire apples and Borden Farm cider. There are just four shares remaining in this season. Please consider joining us for the winter. A signup form will be available soon.

CSA News from Windflower Farm

Delivery #19, October 10 and 12, 2017

This week’s share: Arugula, carrots, onions, lettuces, Delicata squash, tomatoes, broccoli, leeks (or potatoes) and your choice between kale or tatsoi and dill or cilantro. Next week, you’ll get your last tomatoes, your first sweet potatoes, plus acorn squashes, fennel, carrots, onions, broccoli, arugula, lettuces and various other greens and herbs. Your fruit share this week is Empire apples and Borden Farm cider. There are just four shares remaining in this season. Please consider joining us for the winter. A signup form will be available soon.

Choice at the CSA distribution site is not as easy for us to manage as we initially expected. It is not difficult to offer choices, but it is difficult to manage them in such a way as to avoid some disappointment. The chief complaint about choice has been that the “good stuff” goes early, so that there really are no choices for those arriving late in the distribution window. Many people registered their appreciation for choices. A couple who wrote in response to my question about waste mentioned that greater choices at the pickup site helped them reduce waste because they chose items they knew they would use. There were two suggestions in particular for improving how we offer choices that make sense to me: first, seek weekly feedback from the site manager so that the farm team knows what is popular, and adjust quantities accordingly. Instead of sending equal numbers of eggplants and peppers, for example, perhaps, if peppers are more popular, it should be 1/3 eggplants and 2/3 peppers. And, second, hold some totes of vegetables from each of the choice categories to be opened later in the evening, so that those who arrive later also have choices. Those changes might help. But, as one shareholder wrote, because herbs and greens are the most important places to offer choices, perhaps we should limit the idea of choice to those categories. Our goal, of course, is to find the best way to give our CSA members what they want in a way that is equitable and enjoyable. Your feedback is always welcome.

We have needed a workshop for a long time. Vegetable farming is tough on equipment, and we use the off-season to piece it back together. We have a shop, but it’s too small, and it’s not heated. So, we are working on a space large enough for a full-size tractor. Nate, Adam and I poured the concrete floor last week. For those of you who have been here, you’ll know it as the barn where we have our potluck supper. Pouring concrete is nerve-wracking. There is something about the permanence of a large slab that ratchets up the pressure to get it right. And there is something foreign and stressful about having an item you’ve spent thousands on being delivered in a semi-liquid state, poured onto the floor via a shoot, in need of a good deal of shaping and cajoling to look and function the way you want it to, and to have a tight timeline in which to do the work because the concrete is rapidly setting up and is soon to be unworkable. I’ve done just enough work with concrete to know the importance of the setup: I choose calming music, say Eric Clapton or Stevie Ray Vaughan, and a Second Fiddle for my nerves. We get the tools laid out – screed, rakes, bull float, hand trowel, groover, wheel barrow, boots and gloves. In the days before, we framed the perimeter of the pour with lumber and lined it with 2” of blue foam so that it can float independently of the pole barn. We then lined the bottom of the pour with foam and a plastic barrier and placed reinforcing steel throughout. It is still under plastic – a slow cure is best – but we are happy with our work. Nate was working on doors during any spare time he had in September, and they are nearly ready to install. We’ll post something on Instagram soon. With a little more effort, including installation of the small Scandinavian squirrel stove we found last spring, we’ll have a snug space in which to work this winter.

Have a great week, Ted

Jan and the boys, pouring a fresh concrete floor

A post shared by Windflower Farm CSA (@windflowerfarm) on

Author: Central Brooklyn CSA

The Central Brooklyn CSA (CBCSA) is dedicated to working with our partners the New York City Coalition Against Hunger, Windflower Farm, and the Hebron French Speaking SDA Church to continue the work of building a Community Supported Agriculture model that increases access to fresh, local produce for all members of our communities, regardless of income level. Join us as we continue to bring fresh, organic, affordable and nutritious vegetables and fruit to the Bed-Stuy, Crown Heights, and surrounding communities.

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